Monday, July 13, 2015

Chocolate Mousse


Velvety.  Chocolatey.  Port.  Hints of espresso.  Creamy.  Smooth.  Light.  Rich.  Decadent.  Mind-blowing.  Life-altering.  Delicious.  


These are just a few descriptors of this chocolate mousse--it changed my life.  I am not one to toot my own horn, but this mousse is award-winning restaurant worthy.  Truly.  

It is both light and rich, creamy and chocolatey.  There's just a subtle hint of port and espresso to deepen the flavors.  And the best part--its velvety texture.  You could take a bath in it.


I never would have thought to make chocolate mousse, but a close friend of ours just recently summited Denali and he requested it for his celebratory dinner.  I am so glad that he did because this is my new "blow everyone's socks off" dessert.  Not only is it absolutely delicious, but it is so cute to serve in little taster glasses that we've collected from all over the country.


Don't let separating eggs, folding in soft peaked egg whites, or tempering egg yolks deter you.  This mousse really is very easy (and quick!) to make.  

I really cannot adequately express just how incredibly delicious it is.  You'll just have to make it and see for yourself.






Chocolate Mousse:
Mostly adapted from this recipe.

For the mousse...
  • 8 ounces of bittersweet chocolate (60% cocoa), broken into small chunks
  • 5 tablespoons of water
  • 2 tablespoons of special dark cocoa powder
  • 1 tablespoon of port
  • 1 scant teaspoon of instant espresso powder (I use Starbucks Via)
  • 2 eggs, separated
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon of granulated sugar + 1 1/2 teaspoon of granulated sugar
  • 1/8 teaspoon of salt
  • 1 cup + 2 tablespoons of heavy cream
  1. Combine the chocolate bits, water, cocoa powder, port and espresso in a medium bowl.
  2. Place the bowl over a small saucepan filled with an inch or so of water.
  3. Heat over medium-low, stirring the chocolate mixture frequently until it is smooth and silky.
  4. Remove from heat.
  5. In a large bowl, whisk together the egg yolks, the first 1 1/2 teaspoons of sugar, and the salt until it is slightly thickened, about 30 seconds.
  6. While stirring, carefully pour the melted chocolate into the egg mixture.  Whisk/stir to combine.  
  7. Using a hand mixer, whip the egg whites until foamy, about 1 minute.  Add the second 1 1/2 teaspoons of sugar and increase the speed to high.  Continue to whip until soft peaks form, about 1 more minute.  
  8. Gently fold the whipped egg whites into the chocolate mixture until just a few white streaks remain.
  9. Wipe out the bowl you used to whip the egg whites.  Add the heavy cream to the bowl.  Using your hand mixer again, whip the cream on high until it begins to thicken.  Whip until soft peaks form, about 1 minute.  Be careful not to either over- or under-whip.  
  10. Using your spatula again, fold the whipped cream into the mousse until no white streaks remain.
  11. Scoop/spatula the mousse into a gallon-sized ziploc bag.  Cut off a corner to make a hole about an inch in diameter.  Pipe the mousse into individual serving vessels--we used taster glasses.
  12. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate until set and firm, at least 2 hours, but ideally overnight.
For the whipped cream topping...
  • 1 cup of heavy cream
  • 2 tablespoons of granulated sugar
  1. Make the whipped cream just before you are ready to serve the mousse.
  2. In a mixing bowl, combine the heavy cream and the sugar.
  3. Using a hand mixer, whip the cream on high until it begins to thicken.  Continue whipping until soft peaks form, about 1 minute.  Again, be careful not to either over- or under-whip.
  4. Scoop/spatula the whipped cream into a gallon-sized ziploc bag.  Cut off a corner to make a hole about an inch in diameter.  Pipe the whipped cream onto the mousse.
  5. Garnish with fruit pieces, berries, a dash of cocoa or espresso, or just serve plain.
  6. ENJOY!!
**Notes:  The recipe does contain raw eggs.  If you are worried about that, make sure to get pasteurized eggs.  Also, you can omit the port if you want and substitute with vanilla (but that's just not as fun).  Also, I always use a hand mixer when foaming egg whites or making whipped cream.  I find it much easier to control and monitor than my stand mixer.




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